Thursday, January 6, 2011

Vestaburg, PA mine. A series of pictures of deconstruction. Vesta #5

One of the things I find interesting is the dismantling of once proud operations like this mine.  Below are a series of pictures taken over the past 2 years of Vesta number 5.

A giant thank you to coalcampusa.com for the first few pictures.

As always, click on the small picture to enlarge.

Below pictures from COAL CAMP USA


Note the small building on the left, near the railing.


Why I like Bing maps..... If you play w/ angles and distances, you get images taken at different times. In the second picture, you can see the deconstruction in progress.




Metal skeleton of above building now



Entrance to the former Vesta #5 near Vestaburg, PA




Vesta #5 coal bridge remains

Vesta #5 remains of coal bridge. Vestaburg, PA in background


Vesta #5 






There is a great Bing map/ birds eye picture here!















This is a nice before  shot of the hut above HERE!



















Click here to see what the area looked like THEN and compare now to the above panorama picture.





On top of Vesta #5 waste dump





16 comments:

  1. I hate to sound melodramatic, but you are realing doing a service to the local communities by documenting these historic and cultural resources. In truth, I'm a bit surprised, because we live in an area where it seems most people have very little interest in their cultural past. What is old, is simply that, just old (and this is all the more true when dealing with industrial archaeological sites like this one). It's too bad because once these places are removed from the landscape, if they haven't been documented, then a piece of history is lost, and the memories and stories of the people who once lived and experienced life in these places are gone with them. I really think you and Chip deserve some sort of award for documenting these places.

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  2. Thank you for the kind comment, Doug. Chip, Danielle and I just enjoy doing this so much, and its good to know we have people who agree w/ our interests.

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  3. Agree with Doug. Not only are memories being preserved for those who experienced living and working at these sites, but your work is also so informational for family, friends, and generations to come. My dad worked at Mather Mine, Superintendant at gateway, and Superintendant at Vesta 5. Growing up in Mather, I am very familiar with the Mather Mine, and visited him at the Gateway Mine, and worked in the Gateway Mine building when I worked for Greene ARC (looked forward to going to work every day), but knew nothing of the Vesta 5 Mine, not even the exact location. Sad to have such little knowledge of what was such a large part of his life. Memories of not only my father, but all miners, will always live on in photos, articles, documents, and mining memorabilia from and about their respective mines. All people who work towards the common goal of preserving the coal mining way of life are to be commended.

    One question I have is if the above pics are of the location of the mine operations, or are they only of the prep plant along the Mon. Seems to me that when he went to work, it was further away than the location where these pics were taken ??? Just wondering!!!

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    1. Cyndee,

      I just found this site. I knew your Dad (and Mom) very well. The last operating portal, where the men entered the mine,was located between Marianna and Washington. Coal was transported underground via belts for 13 miles to the river and cleaning plant.

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  4. Thank you, Cyndee, I'm glad these pictures/ little histories are of some good to people. We really enjoy doing this, it satisfies our curiosity as well. Yes, this was the prep plant. The coal was mined from (?) and sent over the rather massive bridge over the river. I am not sure where the actual portal was. When you worked at ARC, you used a gateway mine building? Where was this? Not the prep plant on the river, I assume. We will do a blog on Mather soon, but unfortunately, there are no building left standing, just the remains of the waste pile.
    Thanks for reading, Evan

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  5. Mark A.

    Thank you to all of you whoi had the forethought of preserving pictures of memorys and history all going by.As a child of my Grandfather and Uncle who lived in Vestaburg and worked for many years at Vesta5 I applaud you. I have many great childhood memories of my family visiting from Cleveland, Ohio,to Vestaburg. I know live in Los Angeles, CA and I will share these memories and pictures with my surviving relatives living all over the country. It humbles me to see and relive an era with out computers, Pods, tablets and cell phones and 3d LCDs. I am forever greatfull to all of you. Thanks so much

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    1. Thank you, Mark. This Vesta Plant was one of the greatest and largest on the river, your relatives should be proud to know the ones that came before them worked in such a place. It is sad to see things like this go, and that is why we really try to document them while something remains, because once they are gone, only memories are left. If you have any pictures or whatever of things from the past, please feel free to share them!

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  6. Thank you for such great photos!My grandfather Kenneth Bachman was the Chief of Police for J&L and lived across the street from the bowling alley and post office until his death in 1966. My father George Gerba was foreman in the general machine shop until 1981. I had many relatives work for J&L and worked at Vesta. I had many fond memories spending summers in Vestaburg.
    Thanks
    George Gerba

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  7. My dad Ed Beck worked at Vesta 5.

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  8. My Grandfather and father Henry and Patrick Perowski worked there. Dad worked there till they closed it down.

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  9. Thank you for childhood memories. My grandmother lived in what I remember to be called Little New Mexico. My family used to visit her every summer from the mid 40s to the late 60s. I can remember having to walk to Vestaburg to pick up the mail. On the way there as little kids we used to play on the ropes at the opening to one of the mines. I loved looking at the pictures. Wish I could find one of my grandmothers area. My grandfather and a couple of my uncles were miners.

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    1. Hi Michael, My grandparents also lived in "Mexico". In fact my mother was born there in the early '30s. I too spent many of my summers, at my grandparents home, and walked that road to the Post Office in Vesta. My wife and I just visited Vesta and Fredericktown this past weekend. Great memories. Best wishes, Skip (Stan Long)

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  10. Thank you maintain in this great site. My mother was born in the "Mexico" section of Vestaburg and my grandfather and uncles worked Vesta 5 for many years. My favorite childhood memories are of the summers I spent at my grandparents' home in "Mexico". 😊

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  11. Can anyone tell me why there is a section of Vestaburg referred to as "Little Mexico" or "Little New Mexico?"

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    1. I grew up in little Mexico and I do not remember anyone ever saying How It became little Mexico. The town's proper name is new hill.

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  12. My father Bill Bodnar was a maintenance foreman at Vesta 5 Combs Portal up until 1986 when A T Massey closed it. We often talked about his experiences there.

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